“Taste and see that the LORD is good.”

Doing some research on Psalm 34:8-10, I came across this comment by the venerable OT commentator, Franz Delitzsch:

Tasting (γεύσασθαι, Hebr. 6:4f., 1 Pet. 2:3) stands before seeing; for spiritual experience leads to spiritual perception or knowledge, and not vice versâ. Nisi gustaveris, says Bernard, non videbis. David is desirous that others also should experience what he has experienced in order that they may come to know what he has come to know, viz., the goodness of God.

What’s really interesting is what he says in the footnote:

On account of this v. 9, Γεύσασθε καὶ ἴδετε, κ. τ. λ., Ps. 33 (34) was the Communion Psalm of the early church, Constit. Apost. viii. 13, Cyril, Catech. Myst. v. 17.

This has important implications for how the church in general and Christians in particular use and experience the sacraments. So often we flip it the other way around: we think that seeing (knowing, understanding) necessarily precedes experiencing (tasting, enjoying).

The reality is that God provides us and surrounds us with the experience of his love and goodness, long before we ‘get it.’

Published in: on July 5, 2016 at 10:54 am  Leave a Comment  
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O Food of Men Wayfaring

Sing this to the tune of Genevan Psalm 6

O Food of men wayfaring,
The bread of angels sharing,
O Manna from on high!
We hunger; Lord, supply us,
Nor Thy delights deny us,
Whose hearts to Thee draw nigh.

O stream of love past telling,
O purest fountain, welling
From out the Saviour’s side!
We faint with thirst; revive us,
Of Thine abundance give us,
And all we need provide.

O Jesus, by Thee bidden,
We here proclaim Thee, hidden
Through forms of bread and wine.
Grant when the veil is riven,
We may behold, in heaven,
Thy countenance divine.

Cantus Christi

Published in: on August 17, 2014 at 1:06 pm  Leave a Comment  

Break Thou the Bread of Life

Break thou the bread of life,
Dear Lord, to me,
As thou didst break the loaves
Beside the sea;
Throughout the sacred page
I seek thee, Lord,
My spirit faints for thee,
O living Word.

Bless thou the truth, dear Lord,
To me, to me,
As thou didst bless the bread
By Galilee;

Then shall all bondage cease,
All fetters fall;
And I shall find my peace,
My All in all.

Thou art the Bread of Life,
O Lord, to me,
Thy holy Word the truth
That saveth me;
Give me to eat and live
With thee above;
Teach me to love thy truth,
For thou art love.

O send the Spirit, Lord,
Now unto me,
That he may touch mine eyes,
And make me see:
Show me the truth concealed
Within thy Word,
And in the Book revealed
I see the Lord.

This hymn was written by Mary A. Lathbury, an American who devoted her life to preparing Bible study materials.

 

Published in: on July 24, 2014 at 10:54 am  Leave a Comment  
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A Biblical Theology of Prayer

According to one of my teachers Dr. Hughes Oliphant Old, in his monumental Holy Communion in the Piety of the Reformed Church (Tolle Lege Press, 2013):

From the standpoint of a biblical theology of prayer two things should be said: (1) Recount the story of God’s saving acts, as we find them in Psalms 78, 105, and 136, and (2) dedicate our lives to his service in recognition of his grace.

He’s commenting here on the Thanksgiving Prayer or Prayer of Dedication, as he calls it, in Calvin’s communion liturgy. For those of us who’ve grown up on the liturgical forms inherited from the Reformation, this rings true. Old provides a translation of this Lord’s Supper thanksgiving prayer formulated by Calvin:

Heavenly Father, we return to you our prayers and eternal thanks, that you have prospered us with such manifold blessings. You have lifted us up from our poverty and futility and brought us into the communion of your Son Jesus Christ, our Saviour. For our sake you offered him up to death and even now you have given him to us for our food and nourishment.

Now grant us also this further blessing, that we not ever be allowed to forget these things, but have them engraven upon our hearts. Grant that we grow and diligently increase in the faith; that we abound in all kinds of good works. Grant that we live out our whole lives in the exaltation of your glory and the edification of our neighbour, through the same Jesus Christ your Son, who in the unity of the Holy Spirit, lives and reigns eternally with you, O Father. Amen.

 

 

 

60th Anniversary Meditation & Prayer

I was requested to publish this from our 60th Anniversary Celebration. SOLI DEO GLORIA!

Brothers and sisters in Christ, honourable guests, neighbours, friends,

I was asked to focus on the last decade of Cloverdale Canadian Reformed Church, the better part of which I’ve been privileged to serve here. It’s impossible to cover everything, so I will just highlight a few of the great things God has done for us that make us so happy.

Psalm 126 talks about how God’s people at that time “were like those who dreamed.” God has done great things for us in Christ, and when that happens, all sorts of other things happen that only seem possible in a dream. That has been true for us, by God’s grace, over the past decade. I won’t get into all the delightful exegetical details of this beautiful Bible passage. That’s for another time. For the purposes of tonight’s celebration, I just want to highlight a few of our own dreams as a church.

One of our biggest dreams as a church, a dream that is coming true every day for us, is the mission work God has allowed us to do over the past decade. In 2004, setting up theological training in our overseas mission field was just a dream. Today it is a reality. Many church leaders are being trained and churches planted, and through them thousands of others are being reached with the gospel and provided with rich and sound biblical teaching. Many souls are coming to Christ; many others are coming to greater maturity in Christ.

The dream of being a light and witness of Christ, the King of kings and Lord of lords, has always been alive and well in this church. Ever since the first decade of our existence. I’ll share with you just one way I know that is a fact: the red-roofed church donation box in the foyer. If you haven’t seen it yet, make sure you take a look at it later. It’s on a table in the foyer, right by the front entrance.

'The red-roofed church,' one of the first donation boxes, prominently displaying in Dutch and English:  "Preach the gospel to every creature" (Mark 16:15). God's call to mission and evangelism remains a high priority 60 years later.

‘The red-roofed church,’ one of the first donation boxes, prominently displaying in Dutch and English: “Preach the gospel to every creature” (Mark 16:15). God’s call to mission and evangelism remains a high priority 60 years later.

So what’s so special about this red-roofed church? Well, displayed prominently with white letters on the red roof, both in Dutch and in English is this text from Mark 16:15:  “Preach the gospel to every creature!” More about that on Sunday afternoon.

This model-scale church building is where members placed their tithes in the early years of this church. I would imagine that a big part of the dream at that time was to gather enough money to build a church.

It’s obvious that even as they were saving up for their own house of worship, though, those early church members and their leaders—some of whom are represented here tonight, either in person or by their offspring—they saw the importance of bringing the good news of Jesus Christ into the world. Their dream was to be a light for Christ in the world. And that dream hasn’t died. It is still alive and well, and we desire to continue carrying the torch that ignited that dream.

We desire to be used by God to make that dream a reality. God has his ways of making seemingly impossible dreams come true, and we plan to hold on to that dream by God’s grace and in obedience to his call.

Just think about this: The church of Jesus Christ is the most ethnically diverse body of people anywhere in the world. I have it on reliable authority that the city of Surrey, which had Cloverdale as its first town centre, is one of the most ethnically and socially diverse cities in Canada. This is also reflected, to a degree, among us.

Back in the first decade, the church membership list consisted mostly of Dutch-European names, most of them either beginning with Van or Vander, or ending with Veld or Hof or Horst—names and families that are still well-known and deeply cherished among us.

Six decades later, however, our church family mosaic has become even richer and more diverse. Family names like Li and Wu, Chang and Zhang and Dong, Jubenvill and Diack, Lazzara and Hansen, Shei and Burongo and Kalombo have become just as familiar and dear to us. Our church family now has a beautiful blend of many different nationalities.

Our hope and prayer is that our ethnic diversity will continue to grow richer as the years pass, and as God continues to bring all the nations of the earth to Jesus. We were like those who dreamed. Let’s stay that way. Let’s continue to hold God’s Word high, and be obedient to his call, as a church in the world, as a church that belongs to the everlasting kingdom of our Lord Jesus Christ.

PRAYER

Gracious Father, for the joy of being your people,for a gracious sense of your favour in the past, your goodness in the present, and your promises for the future, we give thanks to you, through the Spirit of our Lord Jesus Christ. Thank you, O Father, that so often in this building, and whenever and wherever this your congregation has gathered over the past 60 years, you have been present with us, and spoken your word to us through the reading and the preaching of the gospel.

That among us the waters of baptism have continued to flow—for the forgiveness of our sins in the blood of Jesus, and for a rich welcome into your eternal kingdom.

That among us the bread of life, which is Jesus Christ, has continued to nourish our bodies and souls for eternal life.

We pray, as you are the God who knows our past, and who sees us now, and has planned our future, that as you lead us into another decade of church life, we may have a sense that our past is bathed in your pardoning grace, that our present is held by your strong hand, and that our glorious future in Jesus Christ and his eternal kingdom has been once and for all secured.

For the many gifts that you have distributed among us, many of which have been on beautiful display this evening, we give you thanks.

For the fellowship and love of Jesus Christ and his Spirit that binds us together,as brothers and sisters, as families,as a variety of people brought together as one in Christ, we give you thanks.

For the friendship and love of those who have joined and greeted us tonight,
as neighbours, as friends, as past members and leaders among us, as charter members, we give you thanks.

Give us, both as people and as a church, wills that bow happily to you, affections that rise in love towards you, and lives that more and more please you.

Bless this church. And through us be pleased to bless this city, this province, this land, this world.

All for Jesus, for the sake his kingdom, for your glory, through your mighty Spirit.

To you, O God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, be all glory, as it was in the beginning, is now, and forever shall be, world without end.

AMEN.

Love that liquor sweet

Love is that liquor sweet and most divine,
Which my God feels as blood; but I, as wine.

George Herbert, “The Agonie”

Published in: on November 7, 2013 at 11:04 am  Leave a Comment  
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The Realness of God’s Kingdom

In the bread and wine of the Lord’s supper, God gives us a foretaste of the kingdom that he’s promised us. The kingdom of heaven that he’s promised to us is as real as the bread and wine that we taste at the Lord’s supper! The bread and wine at the Lord’s table are sort of like products that have been imported from the kingdom of God, so that we can get a feel for how real, how good, God’s kingdom is!

Remember what Moses had those 12 men do, whom he sent to explore the land of Canaan (Number 13). He said to them:  Bring back some of the fruit of the land. And that’s exactly what they did. When they reached the Valley of Eshcol, they cut off a branch bearing a single cluster of grapes. Two of them carried it on a pole between them, along with some pomegranates and figs. And when these 12 men came back, they had proof of the goodness of that land. They reported to Moses and Aaron and the whole assembly, we’re told, and showed them the fruit of the land. They said:  We went into the land to which you sent us, and it does flow with milk and honey! Here is the fruit. The Israelites could literally pluck the fruit of the land that God had promised them, and taste it for themselves!

Now that’s exactly what God lets us do at the Lord’s supper: he lets us pluck the fruit of God’s kingdom, and taste for ourselves what we may enjoy to the full in the future! In fact, remember what Jesus said when he instituted the Lord’s supper: I tell you, I will not drink again of this fruit of the vine until that day when I drink it anew with you in my Father’s kingdom (Mark 14:25; Luke 22:18). What he meant was this: as surely as you have drunk this wine with me here and now, so surely will you drink with me in my Father’s kingdom!

A Prayer for the Hungry

Merciful God and Father, you are the Giver of every good and perfect gift. All things belong to you. The food and drink that we consume is also a gift from your hand, something we forget all too easily with our full cupboards and inviting supermarkets. Still, the eyes of all look to you, and you give them their food at their proper time. If you do not open your hand to us, we do not eat.

Show your mercy to the hungry in this world and deliver those who are suffering famine. Presently, we remember those in the horn of Africa (add to this list according to need). Show us how to help them best, giving us generous hearts and open hands.

Prevent us from grabbing more than we need. Deliver us from gluttony and overeating. Save us from drunkenness and unbridled thirst.

Fill us with the Spirit of your Son Jesus Christ, whose food was to do your will and whose delight was always in you. May every body and soul always thirst for you, the living God, and be satisfied with the Bread of heaven and the daily food and drink that you allot to us in good measure and at the proper time.

We pray this in the name of Jesus Christ, our food and drink to life eternal.

AMEN.

Based on Psalms 24; 40; 42; 63; 145; Proverbs 23; John 5,6; Ephesians 5; James 1; Form for the Celebration of the Lord’s Supper

Published in: on July 21, 2011 at 10:32 am  Leave a Comment